THANKS FOR MORE MEMORIES - BLUEBIRD CAFE

THANKS FOR MORE MEMORIES - BLUEBIRD CAFE

BLUEBIRD CAFE

This is a recollection of playing at the Bluebird Cafe by Marc Alan Barnette:

The Bluebird last night was as always amazing. Working with my great buddies, Jeffery Hudson, Heino Moeller, and our new friend, Jesse Clement, was another one of those ethereal experiences. The songs were fun touching and we all had a blast. Thank you so much Jeff, for putting that together. GEtting to play with you and Heino is always a great time! And good to hear you Jesse. You did good. Thanks to Rex, your Dad, for bringing you to us.

But the greatest thing about the Bluebird (outside of the REVERENT tone of the club, the staff, the reputation and all things that come with being the top of the top in venues) is the AUDIENCE!!! They are always the best in the world, because they have REALLY HAD TO EARN THEIR WAY INTO THE BLUEBIRD.

It is difficult to get in now. Everyone has to go to the Bluebird web site on Monday morning, and get in line. Every show for the week, sells out by around 8:05 AM on Monday morning. And these people, often from around the world, make their vacation plans to be there.

They stand in the physical line in the cold, in the heat, in the rain, they are like the POSTAL SERVICE!!!! Most have never experienced songwriting like we do it there. 85 people, sitting there on every word, and every note. Singing along to songs they have never heard, following each line and story, laughing, crying, being touched like songwriting is supposed to do.

They buy Cd's. are well behaved, attentive and even when there are kids there, they are attentive and fun. They come from every state, the UK, Australia, Germany, Mexico, Hungary, Japan, Vietnam, and just about everywhere you can imagine. Some don't speak English. I've even seen some deaf people there, that "FEEL" the music. It is one of the most interesting and humbling part of songwriting. IT IS SONGWRITING.

One of my favorite things is to invite some of the people after the show to go eat and hang out. We usually go to CALIFORNIA KITCHEN, across the street and we really get to know people. Last night was no exception as about 12 of us, Heino's parents, (his Mother is Mexican, and Father from Germany, so he calls himself a "BEANERSCHNITZEL!") and some great people from Illinois, St. Louis, Kentucky, and a couple who I didn't catch the home town. We all had a great time, and they were so sweet and engaging. One of my favorite parts is getting to know people. Thanks to all of them.
FAVORITE BLUEBIRD EXPERIENCE

It reminded me of my favorite Bluebird experience. About 2007. I was playing there and a couple were sitting next to me on the stage. They were so into it, but the woman looked a little uncomfortable. I had a great time with them, laughing and joking. At one point I asked him if he would like to be on the Bluebird stage, and he said "Yes!" So I handed him my guitar, sat him in my chair and went to the bathroom! Was funny as Hell and he was a hoot, sitting up there while the others played the next song.

Afterward we invited he and his wife to eat and they did. We had a great time, and it was their first time to ever come to Nashville. They were on a big trip from upstate New York down to Fla. And were going to Memphis but changed their plans at the last minute to go to the Bluebird and visit Nashville.It was a great night. Then they went on and I never saw them again.
A few months after, I received an email from that guy. He told me that his wife had passed away. She had had Cancer and that was their last trip together.
And the Bluebird show was their favorite part of the trip.

You see, that is what we make at the Bluebird and hopefully in all our endeavors. We make memories for people. It is not just about US. Actually it's not REALLY about us. It is about the way we touch people's lives.

That's what I always want to do. And the Bluebird, and my friends who let me play with them make that easy for me to fulfill what I feel is my job. To entertain and touch people's lives.
Thanks for the opportunity.
by Marc Alan Barnette

Marc Alan Barnette