Nashville Ear Blog

Songwriting and Music Career advice from Music Industry Experts. Do you love music and dream of writing songs or performing on Nashville stages? The top songwriters in the world call Nashville home! Tourist flock to our city to see the next big artist or hear the next hit song. Co-writing, Open Mic Nights and Paid Music Gigs are the dream of many and the reality of a lucky few. We hope you can use the information in these stories to make all of your music dreams come true.

List of Nashville Ear Blog Post

 Marc Alan Barnette

Freshman year in Nashville

My buddy Robert Daniels, did a post yesterday on the saying that Nashville is a "ten year town." Well, that is a well worn phase and while some people do go a little faster, if you investigate the history of the town and the people in it, you find it holds true more times than not.

Chris Gantry

Songwriting is inner expression

Writing is not a craft, it's the force of inner expression in the same way a painter pours out their vision through colors and brush,.there is no manual for expression.

A little about Waylon Jennings

It would be less dignified of me ever to skirt the issue of Waylon Jennings,.
Waylon did not pussy foot around like someone who didn't think he was a blessed boy,.

David Isaacs

Chops vs technique

When you think about “technique” or technical playing, you probably think of what musicians call “chops”. It’s a general term but it’s almost always used to refer to difficult or physically challenging music.

 Marc Alan Barnette

"Paying to play"

I have seen a few posts on Facebook and other places that ask "Why do people in Nashville all play for free? Don't they know that you should get paid for what you do?"
The answer is a bit complicated, but for those of you who have wondered that, here it is:

Chris Gantry

Songwriting Inspiration

The gift of music only calls you to do your best, be honest, inspiring, and available to help others in their quest..

 Marc Alan Barnette

Relations to songs.

Billy Lee and Stephen Clark,
I'll tell you something interesting that relates to this. You both reference my song "TABLES AND CHAIRS." That song has been pretty good to me, a lot of people identify me with it, and request it often.

Marc Alan Barnette

Being paid to be "YOU"

There is something interesting I see and hear a lot on Social networking, especially places like Facebook. and YOU TUBE. It is the endless amount of people that put camera phone videos of themselves doing COVER songs.

 Marc Alan Barnette

Someone stole my song

Okay, this is one of my pet peeves, especially among NEW songwriters! Everybody who writes five songs and then are SURE SOMEONE IS GOING TO STEAL THEIR SONG CALLED “I LOVE YOU BABY!” Because it has NEVER BEEN WRITTEN BEFORE! And go off on the copyright world,(“oh my GOD!

Chris Gantry

The rainbow room (by Chris Gantry)

NASHVILLE IN 1963-64 PLAYING GUITAR AND SINGING AT SKULL SCHULMAN’S RAINBOW ROOM WAS LIKE BEING PRIVY TO THE COUNTRY VERSION OF THE HEEHAW GAMBINO FAMILY;

Songwriter Showcase

"I hear the crowd, I look around, and I can't find one empty chair. Not bad for a girl going nowhere" sings Ashley McBryde on "Girl Goin' Nowhere," the seminal title track from her forthcoming LP. They're words built from experience: over the course of her life, McBryde's been finding her own way to fill those seats and sway those hearts since the very first time her teacher told her that her dreams of writing songs in Nashville would never see the light of day. Every time she was brought down, she persevered; trusting her timeless tone and keen, unwavering eye for the truth. It paid off.

Voted as one of the top three singer/songwriters in Nashville 4 years running in the 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 Nashville Scene "Best Of Nashville" readers poll, Doc Holladay has become one of the most in-demand talents around, while also managing to work as a full time Optometrist.

My first paying gig was when I was 15. Sitting outside of a pawn shop, on a stool playing a guitar. Drawing people inside, back in 1967. I got 5 bucks an hour, a pack of Winston cigaretts, and could play any of the guitars he had in the shop. It was an after school gig, a couple hours every day for quite awhile. I was 17 when I started my 1st band. Didn't have drummer, I did have a lead guitar, a bass, a girl singer, and myself singing and playing guitar, and a guy that "Rattled Elk Ribs, and other Bones" for a beat. Different but real cool back then.